Noby Noby Boy (PlayStation 3)

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Analysis

  • 12904 

    The Early Videos

    I recently published the 1000th video on the OCDgamer YouTube channel, an account that I created in 2006. I was fascinated with the idea of recording videos of games and putting them online, and the first game video uploaded to my channel was from the weird PS3 game Noby Noby Boy, which had built-in YouTube upload support. I recorded 50 seconds of weird snake creature tangled around a rotating thing from a friend's PS3, and uploaded the video on March 28th, 2009. I looked at the metadata for the video, and learned that the filename uploaded from the game is

    o----o.mp4
    , an adorable little ASCII Noby Noby Boy worm.



    The second video I uploaded was more exciting, it was an input recording from March 2010 of me beating the original Mega Man for NES. The final 10 minutes of the game included a difficult boss rush and a final boss fight. The emulator supported recording my key presses, and I could replay the input and record an .AVI after having beaten the game. I uploaded the result to YouTube.


    These kinds of videos were fun, but I didn't have a good general way of recording from Xbox 360 and PS3 games. However, that didn't stop me, and in 2011 and 2012, I recorded a bunch of videos with a laptop camera pointed towards the TV. The games I have horrible quality videos of include Uncharted 2, Gatling Gears, Transformers: War for Cybertron, and Gears of War 2.


    December 2013 I bought myself a PlayStation 4, and a few months later I used the built-in video recording and uploaded a difficult boss fight in glorious 720p 30 FPS of the PS4 Strider game. This was the future of game recording: built-in recording in the console, with a button for capturing a video of a number of minutes of gameplay back in time.



    Later that year, I started streaming gameplay live to the very popular video streaming service, Twitch, and, because Twitch isn't very suitable for my style of video recording, I downloaded the video files from Twitch and reuploaded them to YouTube.
    In 2015, I started making long streams of my first playthrough of Bloodborne.
    From the PC, I also started streaming using OBS, the first games I recorded were Diablo, Elite: Dangerous, and Diablo III, and later on, I would stream emulated games such as Dig Dug, Jackal, and over 7 hours of Castlevania: Symphony of the Night in two videos.
    The longest marathon session was 6 hours of Dark Souls III in May 2016. I wasn't even trying to stream for a long time, it just turned out that way:

    In September 2018, I bought an Elgato HD60 that captures 1920x1080 at 60 FPS via USB. I use OBS to stream it to YouTube and record an offline copy. They are running at 4 MB/s, which is the maximum bandwidth I can reliably upload to YouTube.

    9 Years Later


    Now that the channel has been up for 9 years, the videos have been gathering views, most of them in very low numbers. I have not advertised them anywhere, so I wouldn't expect them to. However, a few of them have been seen by a lot of people:
    When I streamed Pac-Man Championship Edition 2 to YouTube on the hour of its release, the stream had a lot of views, and it is still the most viewed video on my channel:


    8151 minutes watched 2589 views
    In general, my live YouTube streams using the PlayStation 4 built-in streaming system has had the most viewers, but other videos have been reasonably popular even though they weren't streamed live. A lot of my videos of Amiga games have done reasonably well, but none better than Paradroid 90:
    5104 minutes watched 1270 views

    In total, my videos have had 34000 views and 1500 hours watched in total, which of course are very low numbers when divided by the 1000 videos in total.

    Copyright strikes



    This is an interesting situation: I got a copyright claim for the 'Haohmaru' video, starting at 1:49:06, which is the title sequence. The copyright claim is that the music is sampled from the track 'Bishamon' by Swiss rapper Milchmaa. Listening to the track, it is clearly the same music, but of course, since Samurai Shodown II is a game from 1994 and 'Bishamon' is from 2007, Milchmaa obviously sampled from the game, not the other way around. Now, I don't have monetization enabled on my channel (since my videos usually have around 20 views, that would be dumb), but I decided to press the 'File a dispute' button for the copyright claim on principle because this claim made no sense, and I explained the simple facts of the track being from 2007 and the game being from 1994 in the message accompanying the dispute. Today I got a mail from YouTube about the claim, stating: 'After reviewing your dispute, Believe Music [the copyright holder, I assume] has decided that their copyright claim is still valid.' which clearly shows that noone actually looked into anything regarding the video. Doing a YouTube search for Samurai Shodown II, several videos have the same copyright claim on it. Now, there is an 'Appeal rejected dispute' button, but I'm hesitant to press it, because of this description: 'Are you sure you want to appeal? You must provide your contact information to the claimant. Claim will be released: This lets you use the copyrighted material in your video. Video will be taken down: The claimant can ask us to remove your video from YouTube, and you’ll end up with a copyright strike.' A copyright strike is a three-strikes-and-you're-out system, and in this case, 'out' means that my account can be terminated, all uploaded videos removed, and I'm banned from creating any new channels. Not exactly an easy choice to press that button.
    I don't care much about that video, but it does nag me that Believe Music can potentially make illegitimate advertising money on every Samurai Shodown II video on YouTube, and all you can do is to risk getting a copyright strike for attempting removing the copyright claim on your video. The problem will remain for any future video of this game.
    After reading a blog post from another person who had trouble with Believe Music, I decided to contact Believe Music directly, using a form on their website. I wrote the following:
    I got a copyright claim for the linked video, starting at 1:49:06. The copyright claim is that the music is sampled from the track 'Bishamon' by Swiss rapper Milchmaa. Listening to the track, it is clearly the same music, but since Samurai Shodown II is a game from 1994 and 'Bishamon' is from 2007, Milchmaa obviously sampled from the game, not the other way around. I pressed the YouTube 'File a dispute' button for the copyright claim on principle because this claim made no sense, and I explained the simple facts of the track being from 2007 and the game being from 1994 in the message accompanying the dispute. Today I got a mail from YouTube about the claim, stating: 'After reviewing your dispute, Believe Music has decided that their copyright claim is still valid.' I don't know if this was some sort of an automated response, but it seems unlikely that Believe Music would own the rights for the soundtrack to the 1994 SNK game. Doing a YouTube search for Samurai Shodown II, several videos have the same copyright claim by Believe Music on it, and all of them would appear to be illegitimate. Since I can't post the form without ticking the box that I'm the copyright holder for the music, *which I'm certainly not*, I decided to still tick it to be able to contact you. I hope you guys are flexible enough to still deal with this issue, and I think you should remove the box to avoid scaring away other fair disputes from people like me.
    There is quite a lot of talk about Believe Music and copyright claims on reddit. It seems they are claiming a lot of music belongs to them.

Log entries

    2009-03-28
  • 11415 
    I was trying this out at Jeppe's place, and tested the ability of the game to upload a clip to YouTube - my first upload to my YouTube channel.

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